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Explaining divorce mediation in Florida

Divorce has become commonplace in Florida these days, with thousands of couples ending their marriages each year. Not all divorces will end amicably, with both parties agreeing right down the line on everything proposed by either spouse. When the arguments and disagreements occur, it can be downright difficult to come to terms on the divorce. Your last resort will be divorce mediation.

What many couples don't realize is that mediation does not interfere with decision making during the divorce process. The mediator is only present to help move both parties forward in the discussions. The mediator is not allowed to make a decision for either party and is not supposed to encourage one side or the other to accept or reject any offers. The role of the mediator is to listen and keep everyone on track.

The first meeting during divorce mediation will entail both parties and the mediator identifying the issues that need to be discussed for the divorce to be completed. All three will then determine what information needs to be gathered related to the issues that must be discussed. The next couple of meetings involve both parties working towards a common agreement. If needed, the mediator is there to outline what can happen next if the case goes to court.

Should the couple reach an agreement in mediation, the mediator will draft the agreement and give it to both parties for their review. Once the agreement is reviewed, the parties can sign it with witnesses and at the advice of their attorneys. If there are any persisting issues, mediation can be revisited, or the case could head to divorce court.

The average divorce mediation case takes anywhere from three to four two-hour sessions to come to an agreement. These sessions are usually spread out over two months. More complex divorce mediation cases can take anywhere from four to six months to reach an agreement.

To learn more about divorce mediation in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, please take a few minutes to review our web pages on the topics.

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